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It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Caster board. (Discuss) Proposed since October 2009. The Vigorboard is a board similar in style to a skate board or long board. A Vigorboard is constructed from two platforms, each supported by a single caster with a single wheel giving the board a total of two wheels. the two platforms are connected by heavy metal torsion bar that enables the board to twist in the center. The Vigorboard has been released under various tradenames including:[citation needed] Vigorboard (China, 2003; USA, 2005; Australia, 2005) essboard (Korea, 2003) exboard (UK, 2004) X-board (UK, 2004) The Wave (USA, 2004) Vigorboards are mainly available online but can be found in extreme sports shops, and are becoming increasingly popular as a result of their inclusion in a number of school-based anti obesity schemes. There are several UK companies that distribute Vigorboards and other than logos and colour there are no significant differences in the design or construction of the board. Contents 1 St Helens Council Project 2 University of Salford Independent Study 3 Riding technique 4 Trivia and other information 5 References St Helens Council Project The Vigorboard's ability to combine fun with a full cardio-vascular workout has prompted St Helens council to promote the boards in all of its high schools and some of its primary schools, seeing it as a method of inspiring children who wouldn't normally take part in traditional team sports to take regular exercise [1]. The Vigorboard is proving a valuable weapon in the fight against childhood obesity, with some teachers at the schools currently trialing the boards also reporting drops in truancy, with pupils not wishing to miss school should they miss their Vigorboard session [2]. University of Salford Independent Study An independent study conducted by the University of Salford found that vigorboarding resulted in an average increase in heart rate of 227% and a 535% increase in energy expenditure. The study also concluded that vigorboarding results in a 233% greater energy expenditure (407kcal/hr) than walking at 3mph (174.5kcal/hr) [3]. In its conclusion, the authors of the university study went on to say, 'Vigorboarding may be a useful alternative to increasing physical activity levels and energy expenditure, especially for individuals that do not wish to participate in the usual sports or activities performed by adolescents.' [4]. Riding technique The Vigorboard, unlike a skateboard, can make an efficient mode of transport due to the ease of cornering and lack of need to make contact with the ground. To ride a Vigorboard you must move the plates in opposing directions to provide a forward motion. This can be achieved by either: Moving the front and the back of the board must be pushed in opposing directions by the legs (good for short bursts of acceleration but fairly unsustainable), or Holding the front of the board still while moving the back plate in a large swoop left to right (good for long distance riding but slow acceleration), or Holding the back plate still and moving the front plate in forward swooping arches (tiring and slow but rarely needed) There are far fewer tricks that can be performed on a Vigorboard than on a skate board due to its weight (approximately 4 kg) and its highly brittle plastic construction, although as a fairly new invention there are many possibilities yet to be explored. Trivia and other information The Vigorboard is often incorrectly referred to as Wigorboard, Fingorboard, Huricaneboard (a different board that is in existence), Wiggleboard and Wobbleboard. The Vigorboard has been promoted by several councils in the United Kingdom as part of a pilot scheme aimed at making PE more "inclusive" to those uninterested in traditional activities. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Vigorboard References ^ St Helens Council Project ^ New Skateboard Project Esclates ^ Salford University Study Results Summary ^ Full Salford University Report