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Sino-Austronesian (controversial) Geographic distribution: East and Southeast Asia Linguistic Classification: proposed language family Subdivisions: Sino-Tibetan Tibeto-Burman Austronesian Tai-Kadai Malayo-Polynesian Sino-Austronesian is a proposed language family. Its original version was first presented by Laurent Sagart in the early 1990s. Using reconstructions of the Old Chinese language, Sagart argued that the Austronesian languages were related to the Sinitic languages both lexically and morphologically. Additionally, the Tai-Kadai languages were placed internally within the Austronesian family as a sister branch of Malayo-Polynesian. He also considers the Austro-Asiatic language family to be a likely candidate for inclusion, since if the Austric hypothesis proves to be true, Austro-Asiatic would follow along with the Tai-Kadai branch's inclusion in Sino-Austronesian. If compared with genetic evidence, the Sino-Austronesian family would correspond to Haplogroup O, a paternally-transmitted human Y-chromosome DNA haplogroup. Laurent Sagart has also shown that his Sino-Austronesian proposal does not contradict genetic studies in any major way.[1][2] Related proposals include Austric (Wilhelm Schmidt), Austro-Tai (Paul K. Benedict), and Dené-Caucasian (Sergei Starostin). Contents 1 Classification 2 East Asian languages 3 Distributions 4 References 5 See also 6 External links Classification The Formosan languages French linguist and Sinologist Laurent Sagart groups the Austronesian languages in a recursive-like fashion. Sagart considers the Austronesian languages to be related to the Sino-Tibetan languages, and also groups the Tai-Kadai languages as more closely related to the Malayo-Polynesian languages.[3] As a result, Sagart rejects the Austro-Tai hypothesis in its original form, instead considering the Tai-Kadai languages to be fully within the Austronesian branch. Sino-Austronesian (Sino-Tibetan-Austronesian) Tibeto-Burman ("Sino-Tibetan languages") Austronesian Luilang, Pazeh, Saisiat Pituish Atayalic (Thao, Favorlang, Taokas, Papora, Hoanya) Enemish Siraya Walu-Siwaish Tsouic (Paiwan, Rukai, Puyuma, Amis, Bunun) Muish Northeastern Formosan (Kavalan, etc.) Tai-Kadai (Daic or Kra-Dai) Malayo-Polynesian East Asian languages In 2001, Stan Starosta proposed a new language family which he called "East Asian."[4] Like Sagart, Starosta groups Chinese and the Austronesian languages together into one family. However, he also adds a Yangtzean branch that includes the Hmong-Mien and Austro-Asiatic languages and places it as a sister branch of Tibeto-Burman. Austronesian is placed as an outlier branch. Proto-East Asian Austronesian Formosan Extra-Formosan Kra-Dai Malayo-Polynesian Tibeto-Burman-Yangtzean Proto-Yangtzean Hmong-Mien Austro-Asiatic Munda Mon-Khmer Tibeto-Burman Sino-Bodic Sinitic Tangut-Bodish Himalayo-Burman Kamarupan Southern Himalayo-Burman Qiangic Distributions Distribution of Sino-Tibetan languages   Distribution of Austronesian languages   Distribution of Tai-Kadai languages   Distribution of Austro-Asiatic languages   Distribution of Hmong-Mien languages   Distribution of Formosan languages   Distribution of Formosan languages — Blust (1999)   Distribution of Formosan languages — Greenhill, Blust & Gray (2008)   References ^ Sagart, Laurent. 2005. The formation of East Asian Language families: a partial scenario. Languages and genes: recent work and emerging results. Aussois: 22-25 September 2005. http://www.ohll.ish-lyon.cnrs.fr/pages/documents_Aussois_2005/pdf/Laurent_Sagart_et_al.ppt ^ http://www.ddl.ish-lyon.cnrs.fr/colloques/NDHL2008/Powerpoint/10-Sagart.pdf ^ van Driem, George. 2005. Sino-Austronesian vs. Sino-Caucasian, Sino-Bodic vs. Sino-Tibetan, and Tibeto-Burman as default theory. Contemporary Issues in Nepalese Linguistics, pp. 285-338. http://www.eastling.org/paper/Driem.pdf (see page 304) ^ van Driem, George. 2005. Sino-Austronesian vs. Sino-Caucasian, Sino-Bodic vs. Sino-Tibetan, and Tibeto-Burman as default theory. Contemporary Issues in Nepalese Linguistics, pp. 285-338. http://www.eastling.org/paper/Driem.pdf (see page 322) Sagart, Laurent 2005. "Sino-Tibetan-Austronesian: an updated and improved argument." In Laurent Sagart, Roger Blench & Alicia Sanchez-Mazas, eds. The Peopling of East Asia: Putting Together Archaeology, Linguistics and Genetics. London: Routledge Curzon, pp. 161-176. Sagart, Laurent. 2004. The higher phylogeny of Austronesian and the position of Tai-Kadai. Oceanic Linguistics 43:411–440. Sagart, Laurent. 1994. Proto-Austronesian and the Old Chinese evidence for Sino-Austronesian. Oceanic Linguistics 33:271–308. Sagart, Laurent. 1990. Chinese and Austronesian are genetically related. Paper presented at the 23rd International Conference on Sino-Tibetan Languages and Linguistics, October 1990, Arlington, Texas. Starosta, Stan. 2005. "Proto-east Asian and the origin and dispersal of the languages of East and Southeast Asia and the Pacific." In Laurent Sagart, Roger Blench & Alicia Sanchez-Mazas, eds. The Peopling of East Asia: Putting Together Archaeology, Linguistics and Genetics. London: Routledge Curzon, pp. 182-197. See also Classification schemes for Southeast Asian languages Austric languages Austro-Tai languages Dene-Caucasian languages Austronesian languages Sino-Tibetan languages Old Chinese language Tibeto-Burman languages Haplogroup O (Y-DNA) Languages of China External links Laurent Sagart's list of Old Chinese words at the Austronesian Basic Vocabulary Database