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1999 Detroit Tigers Major league affiliations American League (since 1901) Central Division (since 1998) Location Tiger Stadium (since 1912) Detroit, Michigan (since 1901) 1999 information Owner(s) Mike Ilitch Manager(s) Larry Parrish Local television WKBD (Frank Beckmann, Al Kaline) FSN Detroit (Kirk Gibson, Josh Lewin) Local radio WJR (Ernie Harwell, Jim Price) Previous season     Next season The 1999 Detroit Tigers had a record of 66-92 and finished in third place 27½ behind the Indians. After a century of baseball at the corner of Michigan and Trumbull, the 1999 season was the last for the team at Tiger Stadium. On September 27, 1999, Robert Fick had the final hit of the final game at Detroit's Tiger Stadium, a rooftop grand slam, which was the stadium's 11,111th home run.[1] In the 2000 season, the Tigers moved to Comerica Park. Contents 1 Offseason 2 Regular season 2.1 Highlights 2.2 Season standings 2.3 Transactions 2.4 Roster 3 Final game at Tiger Stadium 3.1 The pregame ceremony 3.2 The postgame ceremony 3.3 Ernie Harwell's farewell 4 Player stats 4.1 Batting 4.2 Starting pitchers 4.3 Relief pitchers 4.3.1 Pitching 5 League Leaders and Awards 6 Farm system 7 See also 8 References 9 External links // Offseason October 6, 1998: Doug Bochtler was selected off waivers by the Los Angeles Dodgers from the Detroit Tigers.[2] December 14, 1998: Bill Haselman was signed as a Free Agent with the Detroit Tigers.[3] December 18, 1998: Luis Polonia was signed as a Free Agent with the Detroit Tigers.[4] Regular season Highlights April 12: The Final Opening Day in Tiger Stadium history. Willie Blair and Eric Milton of the Minnesota Twins engaged in a scoreless battle through several innings. The Twins finally won the game in the twelfth inning by a score of 1-0.[5] April 22: Tood Jones gets career save number 100.[6] May 6: Gabe Kapler hits his first home run in Tiger Stadium.[7] May 7–9: The Tigers played the Baltimore Orioles. Shortstop Cal Ripken, Jr. does not appear in one game for the Orioles.[8] May 15: Alice Cooper tosses out the ceremonial first pitch.[9] May 16: Tony Clark hits career home run number 100.[10] May 28: Karim Garcia becomes the 34th player in the history of Major League Baseball to hit a home run over the Tiger Stadium roof in right field.[11] June 4–6: The Tigers played the St. Louis Cardinals. First baseman Mark McGwire does not hit a home run in the series.[8] Season standings AL Central W L Pct. GB Cleveland Indians   97   65 .599    -- Chicago White Sox   75   86 .466 21.5 Detroit Tigers   69   92 .429 27.5 Kansas City Royals   64   97 .398 32.5 Minnesota Twins   63   97 .394 33.0 Transactions April 16, 1999: Mel Rojas was traded by the Los Angeles Dodgers with Dave Mlicki to the Detroit Tigers for Robinson Checo, Aposto Garcia (minors), and Richard Roberts (minors).[12] May 12, 1999: Mel Rojas was released by the Detroit Tigers.[12] Roster 1999 Detroit Tigers Roster Pitchers 14 Matt Anderson 20 Willie Blair 45 Dave Borkowski 26 Doug Brocail 58 Will Brunson 43 Francisco Cordero 40 Nelson Cruz 39 Bryce Florie 52 Beiker Graterol 35 Erik Hiljus 59 Todd Jones 41 Masao Kida 40 Felipe Lira 30 Dave Mlicki 38 Brian Moehler 49 C. J. Nitkowski 53 Willis Roberts 51 Mel Rojas 44 Sean Runyan 22 Justin Thompson 36 Jeff Weaver Catchers 12 Brad Ausmus 37 Bill Haselman 39 Robert Fick Infielders 27 Frank Catalanotto 17 Tony Clark  8 Deivi Cruz  9 Damion Easley 46 Luis García 25,21 Gregg Jefferies 48 José Macías  7 Dean Palmer 32 Jason Wood Outfielders 25 Gabe Alvarez 18 Kimera Bartee 34 Juan Encarnación 24 Karim García  4 Bobby Higginson 21 Brian Hunter 23 Gabe Kapler 29 Luis Polonia Manager 15 Larry Parrish Coaches 35 Rick Adair (pitching) 19 Perry Hill 54 Jeff Jones (bullpen) 13 Lance Parrish  3 Alan Trammell (hitting) 10 Juan Samuel (first base) Final game at Tiger Stadium The final game at Tiger Stadium was played on September 27, 1999 between the Detroit Tigers and the Kansas City Royals. The Tigers were victorious 8-2. The winning pitcher was Detroit starter Brian Moehler. The losing pitcher was Jeff Suppan. The pregame ceremony Prior to the final game at Tiger Stadium, a ceremony was held. It was emceed by then current Tiger broadcaster and Hall of Famer Ernie Harwell. At the ceremony, owner Mike Ilitch spoke along with then Michigan governor John Engler, then Detroit mayor Dennis Archer and Commissioner of Baseball Bud Selig. Also featured at the ceremony was longtime Tiger right fielder and Hall of Famer Al Kaline. Instead of both managers exchanging lineups before the game, both clubs appointed honorary captains. Representing the Tigers was Kaline and representing the Royals was former MVP and Hall of Fame third baseman George Brett. “ Well, here's Robert Fick. Another man who's counted on in the future, wearing Norm Cash's number 25..remember, Al (Kaline) told him he'd hit a home run today. AND HE DID! There she goes! And it is...on the roof! Robert Fick, a grand slam that hits the roof and comes back! Kaline called it! How do you like that? Look at these flashbulbs! What a moment! - Frank Beckmann on WKBD television, calling Fick's eighth inning grand slam off Jeff Montgomery, the final home run hit at Tiger Stadium. ” “ Tigers lead it 8-2. Two down in the ninth inning. Jones is ready. He delivers. Here's a swing and a miss. The game is over, and Tiger Stadium is no more. - Ernie Harwell, calling Carlos Beltran's strikeout to end the game on WJR radio. ” The postgame ceremony The game ended at 7:07 pm. The grounds crew then surrounded home plate. Groundskeeper Charlie McGee, using a pick axe, dug up home plate at 7:13. It would then be transported by Tiger pitchers Matt Anderson, Jeff Weaver, and Francisco Cordero, with police escort, to Comerica Park. Ernie Harwell then read a history of Tiger Stadium accompanied by music from the movie Field of Dreams. He introduced a film containing images of such Tiger legends as Ty Cobb, Sam Crawford, Hughie Jennings and Harry Heilmann. In addition, the Tigers Hall of Famers were honored: Heinie Manush, Mickey Cochrane, Charlie Gehringer, Hank Greenberg, Hal Newhouser, George Kell, and Harwell. Following remarks from Willie Horton and former manager Sparky Anderson, there emerged from the center field gate players from times past, including Mark Fidrych, Bill Freehan, Dick McAuliffe, Dave Bergman, Mickey Stanley, Willie Horton, Kirk Gibson, Cecil Fielder, Al Kaline, the combination of Alan Trammell and Lou Whitaker, and Elden Auker. A line was formed from the center field flagpole to home plate, along which was passed the flag that had flown from the pole in dead center over the finale. After Auker passed the flag to catcher Brad Ausmus, players threw souvenirs into the stands as some reached over and put dirt from the warning track into plastic bags. It was at this time that Harwell gave his final goodbye: "Tonight, we say good-bye. ... Farewell, old friend Tiger Stadium. We will remember." At 8:19, the scoreboard was shut off. At quarter to nine, a final team picture was taken, and by 9 the stands were empty. As the last of the fans left, a sign was hung on the famous right-center field overhang which read: “Today, there is crying in baseball. So long, old friend." Ernie Harwell's farewell "Ladies and gentlemen, less than six months ago, we began a warm season of farewells, and with each passing day we came a little bit closer to this historic occasion. "The Lions, Joe Louis and Nelson Mandela. Six-thousand eight-hundred and seventy-three regular-season games, 35 postseason contests and a trio of spectacular All-Star Games, Tiger Stadium has been home to this great game of baseball. But more than anything, it has been a cherished home to our memories. "Will you remember that last base hit? The last out? How about that last pitch? Or maybe it’s the first time as a child when you saw that green, green grass that will forever be etched into your mind and soul. "Tonight, we say good-bye. But we will not forget. Open your eyes, look around and take a mental picture. Moments like this shall live on forever. "It’s been 88 moving years at Michigan and Trumbull. The tradition built here shall endure along with the permanence of the Olde English D. But tonight we must say good-bye. "Farewell, old friend Tiger Stadium. We will remember." Player stats Batting Note: G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI Brad Ausmus 127 458 126 .275 9 54 Tony Clark 143 536 150 .280 31 99 Damion Easley 151 549 146 .266 20 65 Dean Palmer 150 560 147 .263 38 100 Deivi Cruz 155 518 147 .284 13 58 Juan Encarnacion 132 509 130 .255 19 74 Gabe Kapler 130 416 102 .245 18 49 Bobby Higginson 107 377 90 .239 12 46 Luis Polonia 87 333 108 .324 10 32 Karim Garcia 96 288 69 .240 14 35 Frank Catalanotto 100 286 79 .276 11 18 Gregg Jefferies 70 205 41 .200 6 14 Bill Haselman 48 143 39 .273 4 3 Kimera Bartee 41 77 15 .195 0 0 Brian Hunter 18 55 13 .236 0 4 Gabe Alvarez 22 53 11 .208 2 8 Jason Wood 27 44 7 .159 1 1 Robert Fick 15 41 9 .220 3 3 Luis Garcia 8 9 1 .111 0 0 Jose Macias 5 4 1 .250 1 1 Note: pitchers' batting statistics not included Starting pitchers Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Player G IP W L ERA SO Justin Thompson 24 142.7 9 11 5.11 83 Jeff Weaver 30 163.7 9 12 5.55 114 Willie Blair 39 134.0 3 11 6.85 82 Brian Moehler 32 196.3 10 16 5.04 106 Dave Mlicki 31 191.7 14 12 4.60 119 Relief pitchers Pitching Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Player G IP W L SV ERA SO Todd Jones 65 66.3 4 4 30 3.80 106 Masao Kida 49 64.7 1 0 1 6.26 50 Matt Anderson 37 38.0 2 1 0 5.68 32 Doug Brocail 70 82.0 4 4 2 2.52 78 C.J. Nitkowski 68 81.7 4 5 0 4.30 66 Dave Borkowski 17 76.7 2 6 0 6.10 50 Bryce Florie 27 51.3 2 1 0 4.56 40 Nelson Cruz 29 66.7 2 5 0 5.67 46 Francisco Cordero 20 19.0 2 2 0 3.32 19 Will Brunson 17 12.0 1 0 0 6.00 9 Sean Runyan 12 10.7 0 1 0 3.38 6 Erik Hiljus 6 8.7 0 0 0 4.15 1 Mel Rojas 5 6.3 0 0 0 22.74 6 Beiker Graterol 1 4.0 0 1 0 15.75 2 Felipe Lira 2 3.3 0 0 0 10.80 3 Willis Roberts 1 1.1 0 0 0 13.50 0 League Leaders and Awards This section has no content. You can help Wikipedia by introducing information to it. Farm system See also: Minor league baseball Level Team League Manager AAA Toledo Mud Hens International League Gene Roof AA Jacksonville Suns Southern League Dave Anderson A Lakeland Tigers Florida State League Mark Meleski A West Michigan Whitecaps Midwest League Bruce Fields Short-Season A Oneonta Tigers New York-Penn League Kevin Bradshaw Rookie GCL Tigers Gulf Coast League Gary Green [13] See also 1999 in baseball References ^ Reference.com ^ http://www.baseball-reference.com/b/bochtdo01.shtml ^ http://www.baseball-reference.com/h/haselbi01.shtml ^ Luis Polonia Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com ^ The Final Season, p. 12, Tom Stanton, Thomas Dunne Books, An imprint of St. Martin’s Press, New York, NY, 2001, ISBN 0-312-29156-6 ^ The Final Season, p. 22, Tom Stanton, Thomas Dunne Books, An imprint of St. Martin’s Press, New York, NY, 2001, ISBN 0-312-29156-6 ^ The Final Season, p. 49, Tom Stanton, Thomas Dunne Books, An imprint of St. Martin’s Press, New York, NY, 2001, ISBN 0-312-29156-6 ^ a b The Final Season, p. 57, Tom Stanton, Thomas Dunne Books, An imprint of St. Martin’s Press, New York, NY, 2001, ISBN 0-312-29156-6 ^ The Final Season, p. 70, Tom Stanton, Thomas Dunne Books, An imprint of St. Martin’s Press, New York, NY, 2001, ISBN 0-312-29156-6 ^ The Final Season, p. 74, Tom Stanton, Thomas Dunne Books, An imprint of St. Martin’s Press, New York, NY, 2001, ISBN 0-312-29156-6 ^ The Final Season, p. 85, Tom Stanton, Thomas Dunne Books, An imprint of St. Martin’s Press, New York, NY, 2001, ISBN 0-312-29156-6 ^ a b Mel Rojas Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 3rd edition. Durham, N.C.: Baseball America, 2007 External links Baseball-Reference.com 1999 Tigers v • d • e 1999 MLB season by team AL East Baltimore • Boston • New York • Tampa Bay • Toronto AL Central Chicago • Cleveland • Detroit • Kansas City • Minnesota AL West Anaheim • Oakland • Seattle • Texas NL East Atlanta • Florida • Montréal • New York • Philadelphia NL Central Chicago • Cincinnati • Houston • Milwaukee • Pittsburgh • St. Louis NL West Arizona • Colorado • Los Angeles • San Diego • San Francisco 1999 Major League Baseball Draft • 1999 All-Star Game • 1999 National League Wild Card tie-breaker game • 1999 World Series v • d • e Detroit Tigers Based in Detroit, Michigan Franchise History • Seasons • Records • No-hitters • Award winners and league leaders • Players • Managers • Owners and executives Ballparks Boulevard Park • Bennett Park • Tiger Stadium • Comerica Park Spring Training: Plant Field • Bosse Field • Henley Field • Joker Marchant Stadium Culture Gum Time • Paws • "Detroit Rock City" • "The Bird" • Disco Demolition Night • Tiger Town • 28-out perfect game Important figures Hall of Fame members Sparky Anderson • Jim Bunning • Ty Cobb • Mickey Cochrane • Sam Crawford • Charlie Gehringer • Hank Greenberg • Harry Heilmann • Al Kaline • George Kell • Hal Newhouser Frick Award recipient Ernie Harwell Retired numbers Ty Cobb • 2 • 5 • 6 • 16 • 23 • 42 Minors Player overview • AAA: Toledo Mud Hens • AA: Erie SeaWolves • A: Lakeland Flying Tigers • West Michigan Whitecaps • Connecticut Tigers • Rookie: Gulf Coast League Tigers • DSL Tigers Key personnel Owner: Mike Ilitch • General Manager: Dave Dombrowski • Manager: Jim Leyland World Series championships (4) 1935 • 1945 • 1968 • 1984 League pennants (10) American League: 1907 • 1908 • 1909 • 1934 • 1935 • 1940 • 1945 • 1968 • 1984 • 2006 Division titles (3) East: 1972 • 1984 • 1987 • Central: none Wild card berths (1) 2006 Broadcasters TV: Fox Sports Detroit • Mario Impemba • Rod Allen Radio: Detroit Tigers Radio Network • WXYT  • WXYT-FM  • Dan Dickerson • Jim Price History: List of Detroit Tigers broadcasters   Seasons (110) 1900s 1900 • 1901 • 1902 • 1903 • 1904 • 1905 • 1906 • 1907 • 1908 • 1909 1910s 1910 • 1911 • 1912 • 1913 • 1914 • 1915 • 1916 • 1917 • 1918 • 1919 1920s 1920 • 1921 • 1922 • 1923 • 1924 • 1925 • 1926 • 1927 • 1928 • 1929 1930s 1930 • 1931 • 1932 • 1933 • 1934 • 1935 • 1936 • 1937 • 1938 • 1939 1940s 1940 • 1941 • 1942 • 1943 • 1944 • 1945 • 1946 • 1947 • 1948 • 1949 1950s 1950 • 1951 • 1952 • 1953 • 1954 • 1955 • 1956 • 1957 • 1958 • 1959 1960s 1960 • 1961 • 1962 • 1963 • 1964 • 1965 • 1966 • 1967 • 1968 • 1969 1970s 1970 • 1971 • 1972 • 1973 • 1974 • 1975 • 1976 • 1977 • 1978 • 1979 1980s 1980 • 1981 • 1982 • 1983 • 1984 • 1985 • 1986 • 1987 • 1988 • 1989 1990s 1990 • 1991 • 1992 • 1993 • 1994 • 1995 • 1996 • 1997 • 1998 • 1999 2000s 2000 • 2001 • 2002 • 2003 • 2004 • 2005 • 2006 • 2007 • 2008 • 2009 2010s 2010 • 2011