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Commonwealth Building General information Status Demolished Location Fourth St and Broadway Downtown Louisville Opening 1928 Height Roof 255-foot (78 m) Technical details Floor count 21 Design and construction Developer James Graham Brown The Commonwealth Building was a 21-story, 255-foot (78 m) building in Downtown Louisville, Kentucky located on the northwestern corner of Fourth Street and Broadway. The Commonwealth Building was built by James Graham Brown across Fourth Street from the Brown Hotel in 1928 and originally named after his late brother, Martin Brown[1]. In 1955, a 19 story vertical addition was constructed which took the title of Louisville's tallest building away from the catty-cornered Heyburn Building across Fourth and Broadway. The building featured a light beacon on its roof for a short time until being turned off due to complaints by residents in Floyds Knobs, Indiana. The owner of the building, Commonwealth Life Insurance Company, created Capital Holding Corporation in 1969 [2] and, as the company grew, decided to build a new headquarters building on the southwest corner of Fourth and Market named Capital Holding Center to reflect the company's business interests outside of life insurance. Once Commonwealth Life Insurance Company and Capital Holding relocated to their new headquarters, the Commonwealth Building was imploded on January 16, 1994. A low rise office building and open space now occupy the buildings former site. External links Building page on Emporis References ^ The Encyclopedia of Louisville (John E. Kleber) page 132 ISBN 0813121000 ^ The Encyclopedia of Louisville (John E. Kleber) page 7 ISBN 0813121000 Preceded by Heyburn Building Tallest building in Kentucky 1955-1963 Succeeded by The 800 Apartments This Louisville-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.v · d · e